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Rosh Hashanah with Uncle Max

Rosh Hashanah with Uncle Max
Varda Livney By (author)
Varda Livney Illustrated by
9781728429069
$10.99
Board book
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Available
2021/08/01
Lerner Publishing Group

Limited ***

6.5 X 6.5 in
24 pg


JUVENILE FICTION / Holidays & Celebrations / Other, Religious
JUVENILE FICTION / Family / Multigenerational
JUVENILE FICTION / Humorous Stories


Description

Uncle Max is coming to celebrate Rosh Hashanah, the birthday of the world, with the people he loves. They watch the sun go down, eat their holiday meal, dip challah and apples into honey for a sweet year, and listen to the sound of the shofar.


Reviews

"Uncle Max has arrived to celebrate Rosh Hashanah with the people he loves and even the dog is excited! Uncle Max, clad in his fun floral shirt and sideways baseball cap, joins the family to usher in the world’s birthday and says ‘L’hitra’ot, sun. See you next year!’ as he and the kids watch the sun go down. Uncle Max has a silly side, dipping his glasses into the honey so as to make the whole world look sweet The family Uncle Max visits is diverse, consisting of a range of skin tones and kippot are worn by both male and female members. They celebrate with candle lighting, a festive meal, blessing both wine and grape juice, dipping challah and apples in honey, and going to synagogue to hear the sound of the shofar. The celebra¬tion continues with the birthday cake Uncle Max has brought and everybody sings ‘Yom Huledet Sameach!’ to the world. The text includes some Hebrew lettering for the words wine and honey, but most of the Hebrew terms are transliterated and trans¬lated at the bottom the pages, such as L’hitra’ot (see you later), Dvash (honey), Shofar (ram’s horn), Yom Huledet Sameach (happy birthday) and Shalom (bye). The dog’s ‘woof ‘ is also translated as ‘I’m hungry.’ The illustrations are bright, fun, colorful, and reflect the excitement for the holiday celebration. The children are amazed by the powerful BAAAAAAA of the shofar and exchange New Year wishes happily on the way home from synagogue. Uncle Max has clearly done his job, infusing his family’s Rosh Hashanah holiday with joy and delight." — Ellen Drucker-Albert, Co-editor, Children’s and Teen Literature, AJL News and Reviews; Manager, Adult & Information Services, Cold Spring Harbor Library & Environmental Center, Cold Spring Harbor, NYMagazine


"PreS-Gr 1-On Rosh Hashanah, Uncle Max comes to visit, and together, a Jewish family lights the holiday candles, blesses the wine and grape juice, dips challah and apples in honey, eats other traditional foods, attends synagogue to hear the shofar, and enjoys a special cake to celebrate the birthday of the world. This adorable board book is loaded with accessible, age-appropriate information that never bogs down the text. Hebrew words and phrases (in transliteration) are defined. As in Livney's What I Like About Passover, the colorful, expressive, cartoon illustrations depict a racially diverse, contemporary family: Uncle Max is white, while the children are Black and other family members have varied skin tones. Aong with Chris Barash's Is It Rosh Hashanh Yet?, Tracy Newman's Rosh Hashanah Is Coming!, and Linda Heller's Today Is the Birthday of the World, this is a wonderful way to introduce youngest readers to the holiday.

Verdict: A Strong Choice for Board Book collections and holiday displays." — Rachel Kamin, North Suburban Synagogue Beth El, Highland Park, IL, School Library JournalJournal



Author Bio

Varda Livney grew up in the United States and now lives with her family on Kibbutz Gezer, between the baseball field and the dairy barn. She can hear the crack of the bat and smell the cows while she draws. She has illustrated 10 children’s books, including one she also authored.
Varda Livney grew up in the United States and now lives with her family on Kibbutz Gezer, between the baseball field and the dairy barn. She can hear the crack of the bat and smell the cows while she draws. She has illustrated ten children’s books, including one she also authored.